Hello, Psalt members and supporters.

Over the next few months, we will be sending out some short “observations” that have come to our attention regarding the current theological and political landscape within the Presbyterian Church in Canada.

Our purpose in distributing these “observations” is twofold. Firstly, we want to keep people informed about what is being observed in the various regions of the Presbyterian Church in Canada, and secondly, to solicit your feedback on them. Are you seeing the same trends, occurrences, attitudes, etc., from where you sit, or is it different? We pray that we may be like the “men of Issachar, who understood the times and knew what Israel should do” (1 Chronicles 12:32a NIV).

Blessings,
The Psalt Leadership Team.

Bulletin #1

Observation: There is no longer effective unity in the Presbyterian Church in Canada over core biblical issues, and there is a hesitation to deal with them.

The Presbyterian Church in Canada was formed in 1875 as a union of four branches in Canada of the Scottish Presbyterian Church. The unity lasted until 1925 when two-thirds left to join with the United Church of Canada. The causes of the historic disunity in Scotland and in Canada in 1925 are a matter of record, but there should be no confusion over the current division in the Presbyterian Church in Canada. The most essential biblical issue dividing us is our understanding of and the authority of God’s Word. The Edenic temptation to bend God’s Word is ever before us, “Did God really say…?”

A fearless seeking after the truth of God’s Word can unite us. Talking about the life-changing power of God’s Word can excite and draw others as to a candle. Many of us at Psalt have experienced this to be true.

“Christian unity springs from Christian truth. Unity eludes us when we dodge the truth. Orthodoxy requires the clear rejection of every half-truth.” (Thomas Odin, The Rebirth of Orthodoxy, p. 130)

Jesus is described in Scripture as “the Word of God” and as “the Truth”. We want to challenge the Presbyterian Church in Canada to restart the conversations in our pulpits, pews, and presbyteries about Jesus and His kingdom. For example, what did He mean when He pronounced at the very outset of his ministry, “The kingdom of God is near! Turn away from your sins and believe the Good News”? (Mark 1:15 GNT) He meant the establishment of the lordship of Christ in the hearts of those who seek Him. This is what will unite the Presbyterian Church in Canada.